kqedscience:

Giant Alligator Literally Broke The Scale When Biologists Weighed It
“The previous record for the largest alligator ever legally hunted in Alabama was, until this week, held by 14-foot, 2-inch, 838-pound specimen caught in 2011. But now that honor goes to an even larger critter.
The monster brought in by the Stokes and Jenkins families was easily measured at 15 feet long. But the first attempt at weighing it “completely destroyed the winch assembly used to easily hoist most average gators,” according to AL.com. Thanks to the assistance of a park backhoe, state biologists announced the new record at 1011.5 pounds.”
Find out more at io9.

kqedscience:

Giant Alligator Literally Broke The Scale When Biologists Weighed It

The previous record for the largest alligator ever legally hunted in Alabama was, until this week, held by 14-foot, 2-inch, 838-pound specimen caught in 2011. But now that honor goes to an even larger critter.

The monster brought in by the Stokes and Jenkins families was easily measured at 15 feet long. But the first attempt at weighing it “completely destroyed the winch assembly used to easily hoist most average gators,” according to AL.com. Thanks to the assistance of a park backhoe, state biologists announced the new record at 1011.5 pounds.”

Find out more at io9.


asapscience:

THE SCIENCE OF DEPRESSION

What exactly is going on inside of a depressed person? We look at the scientific basis for depression, and shed light on the fact that it is a disease with biological, psychological, and social implications.

We can see it in our biology, in our genes and in our actions. For those who are depressed, it’s not simply something they can ‘get over’ and ‘be more positive about’. If you know somebody who is suffering, please be compassionate and know that depression is a serious illness and requires genuine recovery/help. 

(via kqedscience)


vfrankmd:

Debuting my new series with three new experiments.

_____________

Link to video -  http://pbly.co/FMDep1

Link to playlist - to.pbs.org/frankensteinmd

Website - http://frankensteinMD.com

Twitter - https://twitter.com/VFrankMD 

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/FrankensteinMD 

Instagram - http://instagram.com/FrankensteinMD 

(via kqedscience)


insteadofwatchingtv:

The Scientific Power of Teamwork


jtotheizzoe:

Humans kill a lot of sharks. Like, A LOT OF SHARKS. More than three every second to be exact. If we keep it up, several shark species will be extinct within the next few decades. 

What would happen in a world without sharks?

That’s the question posed in this week’s episode of It’s Okay To Be Smart. From ecosystems to food chains to depressing death tallies to how much a shark is worth in $$$, there’s plenty of brain chum to watch and share with your fellow shark lovers.

But wait! It gets better! I also teamed up with The Brain Scoop, SciShow, Veritasium, MinuteEarth, and Smarter Every Day to bring you a week’s worth of shark science.

Because lawyers, we’re calling it “Several Consecutive Calendar Days Dedicated to Predatory Cartilaginous Fishes" instead of… well, you know. And unlike certain cable TV channels, our videos are non-fearmongering, unsensationalized, and dedicated to celebrating and protecting sharks , not turning them into bloodthirsty monsters. This should go without saying, but all of the S.C.C.D.D.P.C.F. videos are 100% true, factual and not made up in the least bit, unlike some other shark-related programming.

Check out the full playlist of shark science videos from your favorite channels here, or you can watch it embedded below:


kqedscience:

The New Tentacle-Less Jellyfish Is Not Australia’s Weirdest Animal


“Researchers have discovered two new species of jellyfish off Western Australia’s northwest coast. One is particularly peculiar: It’s larger than its cousins, doesn’t have tentacles and is, according to the discoverer, extremely venomous.
The Keensingia gigas, a type of Irukandji jellyfish, was found by the director of Marine Stinger Advisory Services, Lisa-ann Gershwin. Such jellyfish are normally the size of a fingernail, but these measure the length of an arm.” 
Read more at The Wire.

kqedscience:

The New Tentacle-Less Jellyfish Is Not Australia’s Weirdest Animal

Researchers have discovered two new species of jellyfish off Western Australia’s northwest coast. One is particularly peculiar: It’s larger than its cousins, doesn’t have tentacles and is, according to the discoverer, extremely venomous.

The Keensingia gigas, a type of Irukandji jellyfish, was found by the director of Marine Stinger Advisory Services, Lisa-ann Gershwin. Such jellyfish are normally the size of a fingernail, but these measure the length of an arm.” 

Read more at The Wire.


insteadofwatchingtv:

5 Common Myths About Evolution


theeconomist:

How a tattoo affects your job prospects


jtotheizzoe:

teded:

How Tattooing Really Works

1. Tattooing causes a wound that alerts the body to begin the inflammatory process, calling immune system cells to the wound site to begin repairing the skin. Specialized cells called macrophages eat the invading material (ink) in an attempt to clean up the inflammatory mess. 

2. As these cells travel through the lymphatic system, some of them are carried back with a belly full of dye into the lymph nodes while others remain in the dermis. With no way to dispose of the pigment, the dyes inside them remain visible through the skin. 

3. Some of the ink particles are also suspended in the gel-like matrix of the dermis, while others are engulfed by dermal cells called fibroblasts. Initially, ink is deposited into the epidermis as well, but as the skin heals, the damaged epidermal cells are shed and replaced by new, dye-free cells with the topmost layer peeling off like a healing sunburn.

4. Dermal cells, however, remain in place until they die. When they do, they are taken up, ink and all, by younger cells nearby so the ink stays where it is.

5. So a single tattoo may not truly last forever, but tattoos have been around longer than any existing culture. And their continuing popularity means that the art of tattooing is here to stay.

From the TED-Ed Lesson What makes tattoos permanent? - Claudia Aguirre

Animation by TOGETHER

Ink this interestingness onto your neurons.


kqedscience:

Schizophrenia: What It’s Like to Hear Voices
People who hear auditory hallucinations say the voices can be quiet or cacophonous, singular or crowd-like, but they are almost always harsh and disapproving.
Learn more from KQED Science’s Amy Standen in the last report of her special 3-part series on the changing science of schizophrenia and emerging treatments.

kqedscience:

Schizophrenia: What It’s Like to Hear Voices

People who hear auditory hallucinations say the voices can be quiet or cacophonous, singular or crowd-like, but they are almost always harsh and disapproving.

Learn more from KQED Science’s Amy Standen in the last report of her special 3-part series on the changing science of schizophrenia and emerging treatments.